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Hacked Matter Workshop: Part II

OCT. 18-21 2013
In conjunction with the Shanghai Maker Carnival

Organizers:
Silvia Lindtner, Anna Greenspan & David Li

A collaboration by:
Transfabric, Shanghai Studies Society & XinCheJian

 Supported by:
ISTC-Social
Fudan University, NYU Shanghai, XinCheJian

Abstract

This workshop will take place in conjunction with the 2013 Shanghai Maker Carnival. Its goal is to explore the role that China is playing in the visions and practices of contemporary ‘maker’ culture. Current rhetoric tends to portray manufacturing in China as dominated by enormous, impersonal factories that pump out products that are invented and designed elsewhere. Many dramatically contrast this with the ‘return to manufacturing’ embodied in contemporary ‘maker’ culture that is celebrated for a creativity that traces its roots back to the 1960/70s US Internet counterculture. Hacked Matter aims to challenge such rigid dichotomies and globalizing narratives by focusing on how the professionalizing of ‘maker’ culture is developing increasingly intimate relations with the small-scale factory owners and micro-entrepreneurs that make up China’s core of hardware manufacturing. This exploration implicitly questions distinctions such as copy versus quality, DIY versus professional, ‘made in’ versus ‘created in,’ and dominant culture versus counterculture. Our aim is to produce alternative narratives of China’s role within the bottom-up technological innovations that are currently being produced by a global ‘maker’ culture.

In order to facilitate this rethinking we will engage with science fiction narratives, which shape technological innovation and have long imagined a particular future for Asia. One specific focus is on the dichotomy—most vividly depicted in Ridley Scott’s Bladerunner—that separates a shadowy street culture filled with hackers and noodle shops from a far removed, high-end corporate realm that towers in the skyscrapers above.  Our aim in incorporating such speculative visions is both to reflect upon the role science fiction plays in the making of technological futures and to consider the ways that these stories are complicated by the contemporary practice of global hardware production.

Workshop Program

Friday Oct. 18
7:00pm: 
BBQ Party XinCheJian/W+K
Location: 1035 Changle Rd, Xuhui, China, 200031
(Invite Only) 

Day 1: Saturday Oct. 19

9:30am – 11:00am:  Explore Maker Carnival.
Location: KIC Main Square
11:00am – noon: Keynote lecture Massimo Banzi (Arduino).
Location: KIC Auditorium (signage will be posted on site).

12:30pm – 2:00pm: Group Lunch.
Location: KIC Noodle Shop

2:00pm – 3:00pm: DIY Bio Showcase
Shingo Hisakawa, Vivian Xu, Andreas Siagian, Scott Edmunds
Location: KIC Auditorium

3:30pm – 5:30pm: Panel Discussion I.
Location: KIC Auditorium
“Future Now: Making the Machines of Tomorrow”
Featuring:
Zach Hoeken Smith (Makerbot, HAXL8R)
Paul Dourish (University of California, Irvine)
Anil Menon (Author of Speculative Fiction)
Moderated by: Anna Greenspan (NYU Shanghai) & Suzanne Livingston (Wolff Olins)

7:00pm: Makers’ Dinner
Location: Maker Carnival/KIC

Day 2: Sunday Oct. 20

9:30am – noon: Group tour of the JiuXing Market guided by David Li (XinCheJian)
Meet at Donghu Hotel: 70 Donghu Road

3:00pm – 5:00pm: Panel Discussion II.
Location: KIC Auditorium.
“Made in China” versus “Innovate with China”
Featuring:
Mitch Altman (Noisebridge)
Bunnie Huang (Bunnie Studios)
Eric Pan (SEEED Studio)
Ricky Ye (DF Robot)
Moderated by:
Silvia Lindtner (UCI & Fudan University) & David Li (XinCheJian)

Day 3: Monday Oct. 21
Location: NYU Shanghai
(Invite Only)

10:00am – 11:30am: “Open Science: DIY Bio Hacking” Mini-Workshop. Led by Denisa Kera (National University of Singapore), Andreas Siagian (Squaresolid), Shingo Hisakawa (Tokyo Hackerspace) & Chuan-Che Huang (University of Michigan)

11:30am – noon: break

noon – 2:30pm: Lunch, followed by Group Discussion

2:30pm – 3:00pm: break

3:00pm – 5:00pm: “Building Institutions: Maker Practice in education, design & knowledge production” Mini-Workshop led by Marianne Petit (NYU Shanghai) & Matthew Belanger (NYU Shanghai)

Participants

Mitch Altman (Noisebridge)
Bunnie Huang (Bunnie Studios)
Eric Pan (SEEED Studio)
Ricky Ye (DF Robot)
Zach Hoeken Smith (Makerbot, HAXL8R)
Paul Dourish (University of California, Irvine)
Kavita Philip (University of California, Irvine)
Anil Menon (Author of Speculative Fiction)
Suzanne Livingston (Wolff Olins)
Alice Tagliabue (Arduino)
Massimo Banzi (Arduino)
Andrew Schrock (University of Southern California)
Denisa Kera (National University of Singapore
Marianne Petit (NYU Shanghai)
Matthew Belanger (NYU Shanghai)
Andreas Siagian (Lifepatch, ID)
Shingo Hisakawa (Tokyo Hackerspace)
Anne McClard (Intel)
Anna Greenspan (NYU Shanghai)
David Li (XinCheJian)
Silvia Lindtner (Fudan University & University of California, Irvine)
Chuan-Che Huang (University of Michigan)
Vivian Xu (Parsons, Genspace, New York City)
Scott Edmunds (GigaScience)

hacked matter web

Supported by: Shanghai Studies Society, NYU Shanghai, ISTC UC Irvine, Xinchejian

Organizers: Silvia Lindtner, Anna Greenspan, David Li

10/19/13 -10/20/13: Shanghai
This workshop will take place in conjunction with the 2013 Shanghai Maker Carnival. Its goal is to explore the role that China is playing in the visions and practices of contemporary ‘maker’ culture. Current rhetoric tends to portray manufacturing in China as dominated by enormous, impersonal factories that pump out products that are invented and designed elsewhere. Many dramatically contrast this with the ‘return to manufacturing’ embodied in contemporary ‘maker’ culture that is celebrated for a creativity that traces its roots back to the 1960/70s US Internet counterculture. Hacked Matter aims to challenge such rigid dichotomies and globalizing narratives by focusing on how the professionalizing of ‘maker’ culture is developing increasingly intimate relations with the small-scale factory owners and micro-entrepreneurs that make up China’s core of hardware manufacturing. This exploration implicitly questions distinctions such as copy versus quality, DIY versus professional, ‘made in’ versus ‘created in,’ and dominant culture versus counterculture. Our aim is to produce alternative narratives of China’s role within the bottom-up technological innovations that are currently being produced by a global ‘maker’ culture.

In order to facilitate this rethinking we will engage with science fiction narratives, which shape technological innovation and have long imagined a particular future for Asia. One specific focus is on the dichotomy—most vividly depicted in Ridley Scott’s Bladerunner—that separates a shadowy street culture filled with hackers and noodle shops from a far removed, high-end corporate realm that towers in the skyscrapers above.  Our aim in incorporating such speculative visions is both to reflect upon the role science fiction plays in the making of technological futures and to consider the ways that these stories are complicated by the contemporary practice of global hardware production.

Hacked Matter Part II will consist of four parts:

1) a tour through Maker Carnival;
2) a series of public lectures that will take place alongside the Maker Carnival, in the main auditorium at the Knowledge Innovation Center (KIC);
3) a visit to the small- to mid-size manufacturing sites and markets in the Minhang District;
4) a final day of participant led discussion and activities

Provisional Schedule:

Part I, Saturday 10/19

Morning: A Tour through Maker Carnival

Part II, Saturday 10/19

3-5pm: Panel discussion at KIC auditorium

Part III, Sunday, 10/20:

Morning: Visit to Jiuxing market in Minhang

Part IV, Sunday, 10/20

3-5pm: Panel discussion at KIC auditorium

Part V, Monday, 10/21

Workshop Reflection & Activities at NYU Shanghai.

 

 

Calling all designers, artists, scholars, students and foodies of all types to come map, document, co-create, re-invent and preserve Shanghai’s street food.

First meet up (brainstorming session):  Sunday June. 23. 4pm. Xinchejian 1035 Changle Lu, 2nd floor (nr Ulumuqi Lu)
moveable feasts1(small)
THE STREET FOOD MANIFESTO

Street food is an essential part of urban culture.  The greatest cities all have street food. In its rich variety Shanghai’s street food is a true testament to the hybrid culture of this migrant metropolis. Yet, while elsewhere a street food movement is growing, Shanghai’s street food is under threat. IT IS TIME TO ACT.

  1. We declare Shanghai’s street food must be saved!
  2. We dream of a street food true to a new age — tasty, fast, cheap and convenient and also healthy, safe and clean.
  3. We honor the makeshift creativity and micro-entrepreneurship of the street.
  4. We mourn all that has been lost in the name of ‘cleaning up the street’ (Xiangyang Lu, Wujiang Lu, Tianping Lu etc…)
  5. We celebrate the art and mastery of city’s best street chefs
  6. We imagine night markets and alleyways filled with new culinary mutations.
  7.  We thrive off the intensity of street markets, which give cities life and deplore the sterility of shopping malls with their fast food courts and restaurant chains.
  8. The Future Metropolis must have street food!

 

Day 1: 04/06: 2-5 pm. Associate Mission Building, 169 Yuanmingyuan Road, 1st Floor

Shanghai Studies Symposium, Rockbund Art Museum, NYU Shanghai present

All Tomorrow’s Parties: Summoning Creativity in Shanghai

A Series of Conversations: Initiated by Francesca Tarocco and Anna Greenspan

Episode Six

Hacked Matter: Shanzhai & Maker Culture

In conversation with David Li , Tom Igoe, Amanda Williams, Wu Hao &  Ricky Ye

Moderated by Anna Greenspan (NYU Shanghai) & Silvia Lindtner (University of California, Irvine & Fudan University, Shanghai)

RSVPinfo@shanghaistudies.net

“…the street finds its own uses for things”    -William Gibson

This event probes the connections between the informal networks of shanzhai production and the open innovations of DIY (do it yourself) Maker culture in order to explore the fertile zones of creativity emerging between the dense commercial webs of cheap ‘copycat’ electronics, and the back-room tinkerers playing with the latest developments in open source hardware.

David Li is the founder of XinCheJian, the first hackerspace in China. He will talk about the experience of running a hackerspace in the country that is factory to the world.

Tom Igoe is an Associate Arts Professor at NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP), as well as the co-founder of Arduino, an open source microcontroller environment built for non-technicians. He will present some of the work done at New York University’s ITP, and discuss how it has influenced his work developing the physical computing curriculum there, as well as his work with Arduino and the maker movement.

Amanda Williams is the co-founder of Fabule Fabrications. She will discuss her experience in the HAXLR8R hardware-based startup accelerator, currently in progress in Shenzhen, and the process of transitioning from a craft-based practice to a manufacturing business.

Ricky Ye is the Co-founder of DFRobot, and the founder of RoboticFan blog. He will discuss how open-source hardware has affected the robotics industry, as well as the opportunities brought about by shanzhai.

Wu Hao is the co-founder of Claremont Investment Consultant (WuXi), Co.,Ltd. His interest in hardware innovation stems from his work with Intel’s Consumer Electronic Group and C2TECH (a small ODM).  He will present a case study of C2TECH’s customized smart device, and discuss how to deliver a quick prototype by leveraging the recent developments of shanzhai.

8pm FLY TO SHENZHEN

Day 2: 04/07

10am – noon: David Li leads a tour through Huaqiangbei markets

noon – 1:30pm: lunch

2:30 – 4:30pm: panel at Chaihuo, the Shenzhen hackerspace with  Eric Pan from SeeedStudio, Zach Hoeken Smith from HAXLR8R, Gao Lei from IMLab.

7pm – Show & Tell with Tom Igoe, Chaihuo makers and HAXLR8R start-ups

Day 3: 04/08

9:00am: – noon visit Seeed, tour by Eric Pan, followed by Q&A

noon – 2:30pm: lunch & end of workshop

Workshop Participants: Denisa Kera, Tom Igoe, Suzane Livinstone, Luke Stark,  Juerg Neuschwander, Paul Gazillo, Davide Gomba, Alice Tagliabue, Bruno Nadeau, Amanda Williams, Silvia Lindtner, David Li, Anna Greenspan

IMG_4934

Here is my abstract for a talk at Limmud on April 4

Stories of Shanghai’s contemporary rise are usually accompanied by images of the illuminated skyscrapers of Pudong. Under the spell of this spectacular vision, Shanghai’s hypermodern ethos appears to reanimate the raze and replace mentality of a previous age. The ‘clean slate’ modernism of Pudong – with its echoes of the International Style – belong to a lineage of Chinese Modernity that was forged in the May Fourth Movement. In this epoch, the modern was defined against the ‘shackles of tradition,’ which were tied to an ‘older’ conception of cyclical time. This talk, which comes out of a chapter of my forthcoming book Shanghai Future: Modernity Remade delineates a notion of Shanghai futurism that is rooted, not on the clear light of progress, but rather on a darker, more occulted idea of time that was, and is, haunting the city’s modernity.

IMG_0298

This week I took my class to visit Bao steel, one of the largest SOE in Shanghai and the 2nd largest steel company in the world. We were awed by the vastness of the place. Located on the outskirts of Shanghai, Bao Steel is a factory complex as big as Macau. It has its own newspaper, power station, police, army unit and multiple harbors. It produces millions tonnes of steel per year and has joint ventures in Australia and Brazil, which supply it with iron ore. However, even more than the scale what impressed – or rather overwhelmed -was the raw and seductive power of the industrial machine (the “new beauty” discovered by Marinetti and the Futurists) especially when coupled with the pure intensity of molten metal (see Metalheadz post below).

More Photos after the jump

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My recent trip to Bao Steel reminded me of an old piece written by the ccru. To become legible it had to be rescued from a now obsolete word processing format. I thought I would reprint it here:

“What metal and metallurgy bring to light is a life proper to matter, a vital state of matter as such, a material vitalism that doubtless exists everywhere but is ordinarily hidden or covered or rendered unrecognizable, dissociated by the hylomorphic model. Metallurgy is the consciousness or thought of the matter flow, and metal the correlate of this consciousness. As expressed in panmetalism, metal is coextensive to the whole of matter, and the whole of matter to metallurgy…Not everything is metal but metal is everywhere. Metal is the conductor of all matter. The machinic phylum is metallurgical, or at  least has a metallic head, as its itenerant probe head or guidance device. And thought is born more from metal than from stone….The prodigious idea of Nonorganic Life…was the invention, the intuition of metallurgy. Metal is neither a thing, nor an organism, but a body without organs. The Northern or Gothic Line is above all a mining metallic line delimiting this body.” Deleuze & Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus. 

Terminator 2. Nonorganic life sent back from the future effects a final face-off between its metal body and the human organism. (Only in a Hollywood fairytale can this turn out well for the monkeys.)  Linda Hamilton, hardbody Human Resister, and Arnold Schwarzenegger, territorialized cyborg, deputed into the human cause recoil in horror from Skynet’s latest Terminator,  the T1000. An advance prototype mimetic polyalloy, it is a liquid metal morphing machine. Unencumbered by organic characteristics; integrity, rigidity, stability it operates through constant variation, composing and decomposing its body on the plane of consistency.

The Grundrisse. Sensing the emergence of capitalism’s metal body, anthropoMarx understands Capital as a melting machine, incarnating itself in fleeting commodities and taking on their form, but at the same time changing them just as constantly. Marx represses the positive power of nonorganic invasion, characterising it only negatively, as an inversion of organic vitalism, undeath: capital obtains this ability only by constantly sucking in living labour as its soul, vampire-like.

Capitalism and Schizophrenia. Teeming, seething, swelling, foaming, spreading like an––infectious disease, nameless: Deleuze and Guattari’s Gothic materialism locates the nature of horror as the apprehension of the Body without Organs, a Turing cop aversion to Spinozist single substance. What anthropol perceives as formless is in fact a snaking, feverish line of variation first tracked by metallurgy. Not everything is metal but metal is everywhere…: in the destratified matter at the core of the earth, in electric wires, in money, in the blood’s red pigment, and in the tools of agriculture and the weapons of the war machine. Working only in intensities, speed, temperature,  astride thresholds rather than between them, the metallurgist follows the machinic phylum out beyond the pleasures of the organs. Metallurgy’s Gothic technics constitutes the ultimate betrayal of the human, a pact made with the demon that allows the Golem to escape from the judgments of God.